Nov 27, 2017

Don’t Put Your Audience to Sleep With Your Next Presentation

We’re big fans of Dan Roam’s book, Blah Blah Blah. In a nutshell, the book suggests that complicated words or subjects can be simplified by drawing basic pictures. His thesis is that by doing so, you can help clarify anything. It’s an interesting read and helps illustrate how using visual storytelling can simplify even the most technical document or make a 20-page presentation sing and pop.

Roam’s book aside, as an agency, we’ve also made the move towards visually communicating content to clients — both internal and external. As content creators and storytellers, here are three reasons why we use visuals to help simplify and tell a story.

Simple is Better

Let’s go back to that 20-page presentation. Would you rather sit through that presentation or a short visual talk that still communicates — in a fun, engaging way — the same thing? When you’re presenting key findings, for instance, visuals can speak to multiple client stakeholders, from a CEO to administrative assistants. It’s important to communicate up and down the chain.

Create An Experience

We tell stories at Conveyor, mostly with words. But when presenting we want to provide an experience. Your presentation — and each page — should tell a story. Make your audience want that next page and anticipate each slide. (There’s a reason it’s called Death by PowerPoint. Don’t be that reaper.)

Focus On the Essentials

Visual presentations are, in a way, self-editing. They make us hand-pick the best information, and highlight that information when presenting. We are able to give the big picture, not every detail, and this lets us show and tell, in nice bite-sized chunks.

Remember, a long presentation can be whittled down to five jaw-dropping, awe-inspiring slides. But, you’re still going to have to prove your research, findings, strategy and tactics. Yes, the client will be dazzled by your mic-dropping presentation, but they’re also going to want to see how you got there. And they’re going to need the proof.

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